The president dismissed conscience and medical rights as the ‘freedom to kill you with my COVID.’

By Calvin Freiburger
Article Source

President Joe Biden made clear last Thursday night that he is unsympathetic to public servants put out of work by COVID-19 vaccine mandates and unconcerned about the strain their loss will put on their communities.

“I’m wondering where you stand on that,” moderator Anderson Cooper asked Biden during a live CNN town hall event. “Should police officers, first responders be mandated to get vaccines? And if not, should they be mandated to stay at home, let go?”

“Yes and yes,” Biden answered, going on to claim that he “waited until July to talk about mandating because I tried everything else possible.” He scoffed at the possibility of personnel losses, citing compliance rates in the high 90s among airlines and the military (without mentioning that Southwest Airlines recently backed down from its plans to enforce the mandate).

The president also mocked the notion that his vaccine mandate is a question of freedom as “I have the freedom to kill you with my COVID. No, I mean, come on, freedom?”

For months, American businesses and hospitals have been plagued by staffing shortages, a problem that started during the COVID-19 outbreak last year but has been exacerbated by supply chain disruptions under Biden and “emergency” unemployment benefits supported by Biden.

Despite Biden’s insistence that the “mandates are working,” a growing body of data indicates that the mass vaccination strategy for defeating COVID-19 has failed. The federal government considers more than 189 million Americans (57% of the eligible) to be “fully vaccinated,” yet ABC News reported October 6 that more Americans died of COVID-19 this year (353,000) than in all of 2020 (352,000), according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Beyond doubts about the need for the COVID-19 vaccines for most Americans (bolstered by studies showing that natural immunity lasts longer and is more protective than vaccination), significant concerns remain about the shots’ safety, stemming largely from the fact that they were developed and released far faster than any previous vaccine.

Vaccine defenders note that the one-year development period was not starting from scratch, but rather relied on years of prior research into mRNA technology; and that one of the innovations of the Trump administration’s “Operation Warp Speed” was conducting various aspects of the development process concurrently rather than sequentially, eliminating delays unrelated to safety. However, those factors do not fully account for the condensing of clinical trial phases — each of which can take anywhere from 1-3 years on their own — to just three months apiece.

While cases of severe harm reported to the federal Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) after taking COVID shots represent less than one percent of total doses administered in the United States, a 2010 report submitted to the US Department of Health & Human Services’ (HHS) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) warned that VAERS caught “fewer than 1% of vaccine adverse events.” May reporting from NBC News quotes several mainstream experts acknowledging “gaps” in federal vaccine monitoring.

Nevertheless, the Biden administration clings to the narrative that the COVID-19 vaccines are the key to ending the pandemic, going so far as to falsely claim that the COVID-vaccinated “cannot spread it to you,” despite his own CDC director, Rochelle Walensky, admitting two months earlier that “what [the vaccines] can’t do anymore is prevent transmission.”

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